CRA cracking down on abuse of principal residence exemptions, but their assessments aren’t written in stone


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The following month, the couple moved into House #3, which they had constructed. Soon after they moved in, the real estate agent who had sold them their prior home approached them and asked if he could show their new house to his clients who apparently made an offer that the taxpayer couldn’t refuse. It was sold in Sept. 2009 for a substantial profit of $403,776 above the cost of the land and construction.

Houses #4 and #5

In Dec. 2009, the couple moved into newly purchased House #4, a townhouse on which they had made improvements. It turned out that the townhouse “was not a good buy” for the couple: the taxpayer’s truck was too large to be parked properly in the laneway and the neighbours complained about the couple “having loud social gatherings.” In Jan. 2011, they sold the home for a profit of $54,913.

They then moved into Home #5, making some improvements and doing some landscaping. But, in the end, this home, too, was “not their dream home,” and they sold it and moved out in July 2012, making a profit of $187,574. After selling it, they moved into a sixth home, where they still resided at the time of the trial.

The decision

In determining whether the sale of real estate is considered business income, the courts have traditionally considered the following factors: the nature of the property sold and how the taxpayer used it; the length of the ownership period; the frequency or number of other similar transactions by the taxpayer; the work expended on or in connection with the property; the circumstances giving rise to the sale of the property; and the taxpayer’s motive regarding the sale of the property at the time of purchase.



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